HazDat
7Sep/13

California first to get electronic license plates? Easier to track?

The California State Senate approves a bill that would allow for a pilot program to test digital license plates. Will it involve tracking?

by Chris Matyszczyk

California is the home of everything that's new, exciting, and, well, accidentally nefarious.

It's a delight, therefore, to hear that we here in the Golden State might be the first to get electronic license plates.

Yes, the young and the restless of tech will be able to have their new "TE$LA1" plate beamed directly to their car.

What could be more moving? I am beaming at Ars Technica for discovering that a bill has passed the California State Senate, allowing for a pilot program to launch the scheme.

... CONTINUE READING »

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5Sep/13

N.S.A. Foils Much Internet Encryption

NSAThe National Security Agency is winning its long-running secret war on encryption, using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age, according to newly disclosed documents.

The agency has circumvented or cracked much of the encryption, or digital scrambling, that guards global commerce and banking systems, protects sensitive data like trade secrets and medical records, and automatically secures the e-mails, Web searches, Internet chats and phone calls of Americans and others around the world, the documents show.

Many users assume — or have been assured by Internet companies — that their data is safe from prying eyes, including those of the government, and the N.S.A. wants to keep it that way. The agency treats its recent successes in deciphering protected information as among its most closely guarded secrets, restricted to those cleared for a highly classified program code-named Bullrun, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor. ... CONTINUE READING »

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2Sep/13

Facebook Wants to Use Your Profile Pic to Help Automatic Photo Tagging

20130902-160235.jpg Facebook is proposing a series of changes to its terms if service. There's a lot of legal mumbo jumbo, but the most interesting piece is that Facebook wants to start using your profile photo as the basis for suggesting that you be tagged in your friends' photos. What Facebook's really saying here is that the content of your profile photo—and your face really—is now an actionable piece of data that it can associate with your identity. Previously, you could keep Facebook from "knowing" your face by not letting other people removing any tags of you. That's not exactly an option any more. In theory, you could refuse to upload your likeness to Facebook, but that's a pretty extreme measure. It's always been possible to turn off tag suggestions for your profile. When you do so, it deletes the "template" that Facebook created to identify you. It appears that this deletion applies to any template information that would be created from your Facebook profile photo as well. When we're talking about all this, it's important to remember that most people don't ever touch their privacy settings. So if the proposed changes go through, this is how it's going to be for a majority of users. So far, Facebook has only posted a section-by-section summary of the changes has been posted, but the actual tracked changes document isn't online yet that we can see. Luckily, ATD has the relevant section in its news post:

We are able to suggest that your friend tag you in a picture by scanning and comparing your friend’s pictures to information we’ve put together from your profile pictures and the other photos in which you’ve been tagged.

The old language:

We are able to suggest that your friend tag you in a picture by scanning and comparing your friend's pictures to information we've put together from the other photos you've been tagged in. This allows us to make these suggestions.

In the short-term, the change will improve the company's facial recognition so that it can suggest you be tagged in more photos all over the site. And of course, if it can find you all over the site, then it's got a more comprehensive sense of who you are. And of course since this is a proposed change, it won't take effect until after a certain waiting and deliberation period—so if it matters to you, make sure to weigh in.

Via http://gizmodo.com/facebook-wants-to-get-a-better-picture-of-what-your-loo-1222315712

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18Jul/13

Canadian man charged for hosting murder video

Mark Marek, a Canadian man, was charged with corrupting morals for hosting a video showing a grizzly murder on a website.

TORONTO — Canadian police have charged the owner and operator of a website that hosted a gruesome video of a murder and dismemberment last May.

Edmonton homicide detectives said Wednesday that they have charged Mark Marek, 38, with corrupting morals.

Luka Magnotta is accused of killing his Chinese lover Jun Lin last May and filming a video that shows him stabbing and having sex with the dismembered corpse. He has pleaded not guilty in the slaying of Lin.

Staff Sgt. Bill Clark says Marek allegedly posted the video sent to him by Magnotta online knowing that it depicted a real murder.

Marek has been remanded and will appear in bail court Thursday.

Police say he could face more charges pending further investigation.

Via http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/police-charge-website-hosted-murder-video-19691123

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21Nov/12

Bionic Mannequins Spy on Shoppers to Boost Luxury Sales

Store mannequins are meant to catch your eye. Soon you may catch theirs.

Benetton Group SpA is among fashion brands deploying mannequins equipped with technology used to identify criminals at airports to watch over shoppers in their stores.

Retailers are introducing the EyeSee, sold by Italian mannequin maker Almax SpA, to glean data on customers much as online merchants are able to do. The 4,000-euro ($5,072) device has spurred shops to adjust window displays, store layouts and promotions to keep consumers walking in the door and spending.

“It’s spooky,” said Luca Solca, head of luxury goods research at Exane BNP Paribas in London. “You wouldn’t expect a mannequin to be observing you.”

The EyeSee looks ordinary enough on the outside, with its slender polystyrene frame, blank face and improbable pose. Inside, it’s no dummy. A camera embedded in one eye feeds data into facial-recognition software like that used by police. It logs the age, gender, and race of passers-by.

Demand for the device shows how retailers are turning to technology to help personalize their offers as growth slows in the $245 billion luxury goods industry. Bain & Co. predicts the luxury market will expand 5 percent in 2012, less than half last year’s rate.

“Any software that can help profile people while keeping their identities anonymous is fantastic,” said Uché Okonkwo, executive director of consultant Luxe Corp. It “could really enhance the shopping experience, the product assortment, and help brands better understand their customers.”

Eye-Level

While some stores deploy similar technology to watch shoppers from overhead security cameras, the EyeSee provides better data because it stands at eye level and invites customer attention, Almax contends.

The mannequin, which went on sale last December and is now being used in three European countries and the U.S., has led one outlet to adjust its window displays after revealing that men who shopped in the first two days of a sale spent more than women, according to Almax.

A clothier introduced a children’s line after the dummy showed that kids made up more than half its mid-afternoon traffic, the company says. Another store found that a third of visitors using one of its doors after 4 p.m. were Asian, prompting it to place Chinese-speaking staff by that entrance.

‘Changing Landscape’

A spokesman for Benetton declined to elaborate on where or why the clothier is using the EyeSee.

Max Catanese, chief executive officer of the 40-year-old mannequin maker, declined to name clients, citing confidentiality agreements. Five companies, including leading fashion brands, are using a total of “a few dozen” of the mannequins with orders for at least that many more, he says.

Burberry Group Plc (BRBY) and Nordstrom Inc. (JWN) are among retailers that say they aren’t on the list. Even so, they are helping blur the line between the physical shopping experience and Web retailing by setting up WiFi, iPads and video screens at their outlets to better engage shoppers.

Nordstrom, a U.S. chain of more than 100 department stores, says facial-recognition software may go a step too far.

“It’s a changing landscape but we’re always going to be sensitive about respecting the customer’s boundaries,” said spokesman Colin Johnson.

No Choice

Others say profiling customers raises legal and ethical issues. U.S. and European Union regulations permit the use of cameras for security purposes, though retailers need to put up signs in their stores warning customers they may be filmed. Watching people solely for commercial gain may break the rules and could be viewed as gathering personal data without consent, says Christopher Mesnooh, a partner at law firm Field Fisher Waterhouse in Paris.

“If you go on Facebook, before you start the registration process, you can see exactly what information they are going to collect and what they’re going to do with it,” said Mesnooh. “If you’re walking into a store, where’s the choice?”

So far Almax hasn’t faced obstacles to selling the dummy, CEO Catanese said. Since the EyeSee doesn’t store any images, retailers can use it as long as they have a closed-circuit television license, he said.

Some clients have asked for the Eyesee to be rigged to recognize employees so they don’t muddy the picture of customer behavior. In those cases, workers have to agree to be filmed, says Catanese. That option may be extended to shoppers, where loyal spenders would be invited to opt-in in return for rewards, he said.

Not Deaf

“The retail community is starting to get wise to the opportunity around personalization,” said Lorna Hall, retail editor at fashion forecaster WGSN. “The golden ticket is getting to the point where they’ve got my details, they know what I bought last time I came in.”

To give the EyeSee ears as well as eyes, Almax is testing technology that recognizes words to allow retailers to eavesdrop on what shoppers say about the mannequin’s attire. Catanese says the company also plans to add screens next to the dummies to prompt customers about products relevant to their profile, much like cookies and pop-up ads on a website.

Too much sophistication could backfire, says Hall, because it’s a fine line between technology that helps and technology that irks.

A promotional prompt or a reminder about where to find women’s shoes “could become a digital version of a very pushy sales assistant,” she said. “And we all know how we feel about those.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Roberts in Paris at aroberts36@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Celeste Perri at cperri@bloomberg.net

[Via Bloomberg.com]

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12Jun/12

iSpy: Apple Spy Planes @ WWDC

Attention sunbathers:

Why are these 1960's spys looking to the sky? Perhaps they're eyeing the competition.

Apple made many notable announcements at yesterday's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). But less attention has gone to the fleet of spy planes bringing Apple's new aerial mapping software down to earth.

Also eyeing the competition is Google, who's mapping software will be replaced by Apple's new offering in iOS devices this Fall. Similarly, Google is said to have launched its own fleet of spy planes. Making the friendly skies a little less so.

With a resolution capible of focusing on objects as small as four inches, sunbathers might want to embrace their tan lines this Summer.

See: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2157582/Google-Apples-spy-planes-sun-lounger-sights.html#ixzz1xdA50Uyf

 

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12Jun/12

UK reopens probe into Google’s Street View data capture

The ICO re-opened its investigation after a US probe uncovered more detail about the data captured Google is back under investigation after gathering personal data while cameras on its cars took pictures for its UK Street View service.

The Information Commissioner’s Office previously dropped a probe into the affair after being told limited data had been “mistakenly collected”.

However, it said it had since become aware of reports that a Google engineer had deliberately written software to obtain a wider range of material.

The ICO has asked for more information.

... CONTINUE READING »

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4May/12

Corporations Are People, My Friend. But, IP Addresses Are Not.

When a judge makes a good decision, it shouldn't be news. But, in this case, it's very good news indeed.  This week New York Magistrate Judge Gary Brown for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York filed a 26-page ruling pointing out that the person listed as an Internet account holder is often not the person using the account.

"It is no more likely that the subscriber to an IP address carried out a particular computer function–here the purported illegal downloading of a single pornographic film–than to say an individual who pays the telephone bill made a specific telephone call," Brown said in his Order & Report & Recommendation, filed May 1.

"An IP address merely identifies the location where a certain activity occurred", Brown noted. A computer in a household is usually shared, which means a child, a boyfriend, or any other visitor, is just as likely to be using the computer. Brown also noted that many households now have a wireless network. If the network is not secured, many people, including neighbors and strangers, can be sharing that IP address without the original account holder's knowledge.

"Considering the weak relationship between an IP address and personal identity, it's likely copyright holders were accusing the wrong people of violating copyright", Brown noted. Mass-BitTorrent lawsuits relying entirely on IP addresses to identify copyright infringers were a "waste of judicial resources," he wrote.

VIA: http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/security/297475-ip-address-not-a-person-judge-says-in-copyright-lawsuit

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12Apr/12

Social Networking Bill of Rights

BackgroundCheck.org has developed an interesting infographic seaks to address your rights as a social network user. (Click below for a larger view.)

Via: http://www.backgroundcheck.org/social-networking-bill-of-rights/

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30Mar/12

‘Massive’ credit card data breach involves all major brands

This breach has already been confirmed by the big processors, and seems to be larger in scope than prior breaches.

VIA http://money.cnn.com/2012/03/30/technology/credit-card-data-breach/?source=cnn_bin

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